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Augmented Reality, Augmented Ethics: Who Has the Right to Augment a Particular Physical Space?

Conference Paper
Erica L. Neely
Presented at the International Association for Computing and Philosophy Annual Meeting
Publication year: 2017

Augmented reality (AR) blends the virtual and physical worlds such that the virtual content experienced by a user of AR technology depends on his or her geographic location.  With the advent of games such as Pokémon GO and technologies such as HoloLens, an increasing number of people are encountering augmented reality.  This raises a number of ethical concerns, among them the issue of who has an ethical right to augment a particular physical space.  I address this question by distinguishing public and private spaces; I also separate the case where we access augmentations via many different applications from the case where there is a more unified sphere of augmentation.

Private property under a unified sphere of augmentation acts much like physical property today; owners retain the right to augment their property and prevent others from augmenting it.  Private property with competing apps is more complex; it is not clear that owners have a right to prevent most augmentations in this case, given that those augmenations do not interfere with the owner’s use of the property.  I also discuss several difficult cases such as augmenting a daycare with explicit sexual or violent images.

Public property with competing apps is relatively straightforward, as those apps function much like different guidebooks; they are public comments on public property which do not interfere with each other.  Under a unified sphere of augmentation, the matter becomes trickier.  Ultimately it is unclear whether augmentations will be seen more as public speech (which we value) or grafitti (which we do not).  Unfortunately, there may not be a single answer to this; I suggest the need for further consideration of what kinds of augmentations we view as worth protecting.

No Player is Ideal: Why Video Game Designers Cannot Ethically Ignore Players’ Real-World Identities

Conference Paper
Erica L. Neely
Presented at the CEPE/ETHICOMP Joint Meeting
Publication year: 2017

As video games flourish, designers have a responsibility to treat players and potential players justly.  In deontological terms, designers have obligations to treat all of them as having intrinsic worth.  Since players are a diverse group, designers must not simply focus on an idealized gamer, who is typically a straight white male.  This creates a duty to consider whether design choices place unnecessary barriers to the ability of certain groups of players to achieve their ends in playing a game.  I examine the implication of this for the gameworld, avatar design, and accessibility to players with disabilities.  I also consider the limits of designers’ control by examining responses to abusive player chat in multiplayer games.  Ultimately, a careful balance must be found between what is necessary to create the game a designer envisions and what is necessary for treating all players as intrinsically worthy beings.

The Ethics of Choice in Single-Player Video Games

Conference Paper
Erica L. Neely
Presented at the International Association for Computing and Philosophy Annual Meeting
Publication year: 2016

Many people have discussed ethics and video games. Thus far the focus has been on two elements: the actions players take within a game and whether certain kinds of games are wrong to create, such as extremely violent video games. Taking Miguel Sicart’s work as a key starting place, I emphasize the moral importance of choice with respect to video games. This has several components. Focusing on single-player games, I consider gameplay choices that players make, such as how to complete a particular mission in a game and how the game evaluates and adapts to player choices in a way that attempts to impose and/or encourage a particular moral stance. Much literature focuses specifically on gameplay as the interactive component that makes video games a unique medium. However, I stress that we must also consider the choices designers make when they program a game; these choices can frequently go unnoticed and unquestioned by players. As such, while I agree with those who emphasize that players are capable of moral reflection, I question how often they actually engage in moral reflection. This suggests that there is room for pragmatic concern about how actual players – not ideal players – are affected by video games.

Video Games, Power, and Social Responsibility

Conference Paper
Erica L. Neely
Presented at the North American Society for Social Philosophy Annual Meeting
Publication year: 2016

Abstract: Video games have become a pervasive form of entertainment in current culture.  As such, it is essential to examine the power structures inherent in creating and participating in video games; to fail to do so runs the risk of simply recreating current social injustices.  While designers hold most of the power in single-player video games, that power is shared with the players in multiplayer games.  I argue that this power comes with social responsibilities.

Designers’ social responsibilities are most evident in a game’s creation; they have a strong responsibility to avoid microaggressions in the design of their game world and gameplay.  Their obligations to the game community do not end at game creation.  This is particularly evident in multiplayer games, since designers have an ability to encourage or discourage particular behaviors among players.  However, a game’s community is not only what occurs inside the game; it encompasses the behavior of its fans in alternate venues such as forums on the game’s website.  In this way a game’s community blends into the larger gamer community; I consider the obligations that designers have both to the community of their specific games and to the gamer community as a whole.

While game designers hold much of the power, players hold power as well.  Particularly in multiplayer games players have ethical responsibilities towards other players within a game; while games take place in a fictional space, the players are real and can suffer real harms.  However, responsibility is not shared equally.  Due to both player-created social status and inherent power structures in many games, particular players hold positions of power within the game community.  I argue that these players have greater than average social obligations as a result of that power.

The Risks of Revolution: Ethical Dilemmas in 3D Printing from a US Perspective

Journal Article
Erica L. Neely
Journal of Science and Engineering Ethics 22(5), 1285–1297. doi: 10.1007/s11948-015-9707-4 (2016)
Publication year: 2016

Abstract: Additive manufacturing has spread widely over the past decade, especially with the availability of home 3D printers. In the future, many items may be manufactured at home, which raises two ethical issues. First, there are questions of safety. Our current safety regulations depend on centralized manufacturing assumptions; they will be difficult to enforce on this new model of manufacturing. Using current US law as an example, I argue that consumers are not capable of fully assessing all relevant risks and thus continue to require protection; any regulation will likely apply to plans, however, not physical objects. Second, there are intellectual property issues. In combination with a 3D scanner, it is now possible to scan items and print copies; many items are not protected from this by current intellectual property laws. I argue that these laws are ethically sufficient. Patent exists to protect what is innovative; the rest is properly not protected. Intellectual property rests on the notion of creativity, but what counts as creative changes with the rise of new technologies.

The Care of the Reaper Man: Death, the Auditors, and the Importance of Individuality

Book chapter
Erica L. Neely
In J. Held & J. South (Eds.) Philosophy and Terry Pratchett. Palgrave MacMillan. (2014)
Publication year: 2014

Abstract: In Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels, there is an ongoing battle between Death and a group of beings known as the Auditors.  These beings strive to maintain order in the universe and dislike humanity and all its inherent messiness.  Death, on the other hand, is rather fascinated by humans and sees value in the individuality humans exhibit.  This illustrates a more general tension between the individual and the collective.  One place this tension emerges is in ethical theorizing.  While traditionally there is a push towards universalization in ethics, recently many have come to believe that our ethical thinking must recognize the embodied and individual nature of humans.  This position is echoed by Death in his battle with the Auditors; he knows that humans are inherently individual and this cannot be stifled without destroying humanity.  Death thus becomes the unexpected champion of humanity and individuality, explicitly committed to the importance of care.  I argue that Death’s actions in their various skirmishes demonstrate that the only way to do justice to the group is by fairly treating the individual; to care for the individual in the way he does is to enable justice to occur.  While Death may claim that “THERE IS NO JUSTICE.  THERE IS JUST US”, his care is the catalyst for justice to occur.

Note: this publisher does not permit self-archiving; contact me for a copy.

Virtuous Salads and Sinful Desserts: How the Rhetoric of Morality Taints our Relationship to Food

Conference Paper
Erica L. Neely
Presented at the North American Society for Social Philosophy Annual Meeting
Publication year: 2013

Abstract:

We use moral terminology when talking about food; we judge it “good” or “bad” and apply moral terms such as “sinful” to it.  While food varies in nutritional value, using these terms without qualification falsely implies that nutrition is the only determiner of value. I follow Aristotle in arguing that goodness has to do with function and showing that food has many other functions besides keeping us alive.  Food provides emotional sustenance, aesthetic pleasure, and can fulfill ritual or communal purposes.  Multiple uses for food lead to multiple goods.

The rhetoric surrounding food ignores this plurality.  This generates problems, particularly since we judge the eater, not simply the food; we see people eating “bad” foods as themselves bad.  This has unacceptable social ramifications, since we risk labeling entire cultures and social classes as bad for consuming foods our society disapproves of.  Moreover, such absolute judgment is inconsistent with our treatment of permissible risk in other arenas; a food which poses a threat to our health should not invite special moral condemnation beyond that usually applied to risky activities.  No food is good or bad absolutely; our rhetoric to that effect is misleading at best and potentially harmful at worst.

Intertwining Identities: Why There is No Escaping Physical Identity in the Virtual World

Conference Paper
Erica L. Neely
Presented at the International Association for Computing and Philosophy Annual Meeting
Publication year: 2013

Abstract: Understanding identity requires understanding the communities to which we belong; virtual communities are increasingly relevant to our personal identity.  While many point to alleged differences of behavior and presentation online, these are not as great as first appear; characteristics which encourage antisocial behavior online do so offline as well.  Furthermore, while deception and alteration of identity are possible online, they are difficult to sustain and rooted in our understanding of physical identities.  Thus while there is space between our physical and virtual representations, the two are not sharply separated.  Anonymity is often used to argue for such a separation, however while there is sufficient anonymity to allow for deceptive portrayals online, it is harder to attain than most realize. I discuss ways of piercing anonymity online and possible future ramifications of our increasing ability to do so.  Less anonymity will likely lead to greater responsibility for our online actions, but it also will diminish our ability to use virtual worlds for identity experimentation.  Ultimately, I argue that virtual and physical identities are intertwined: our online identity is influenced by the physical world but can also shape who we are and who we become.

Moor Food for Thought: 5 Key Issues in Computer Ethics

Conference PaperInvited Symposium
Erica L. Neely
Presented at the International Association for Computing and Philosophy Annual Meeting
Publication year: 2013

Abstract: Almost thirty years ago, James Moor’s paper “What is Computer Ethics?” was published, arguing for the special status of computer ethics.  As part of an invited symposium celebrating his work, I reflect on the issues Moor raises before turning to the five overarching areas I see as most important in computer ethics today: privacy, identity, trust, responsibility, and access.  Within each of these broad areas I consider a number of related philosophical questions which have either arisen or become more pressing with advances in technology.  While Moor argued for the special status of computer ethics thirty years ago, I argue that the situation is even more urgent now, with our abilities rapidly outpacing social convention on how to handle relevant ethical dilemmas.

Machines and the Moral Community

Journal Article
Erica L. Neely
Philosophy and Technology 27(1), 97-111. doi: 10.1007/s13347-013-0114-y (2013)
Publication year: 2013

Abstract:  A key distinction in ethics is between members and non-members of the moral community.  Over time, our notion of this community has expanded as we have moved from a rationality  criterion to a sentience criterion for membership.  I argue that a sentience criterion is insufficient to accommodate all members of the moral community; the true underlying criterion can be understood in terms of whether a being has interests.  This may be extended to conscious, self-aware machines, as well as to any autonomous intelligent machines.  Such machines exhibit an ability to formulate desires for the course of their own existence; this gives them basic moral standing.  While not all machines display autonomy, those which do must be treated as moral patients; to ignore their claims to moral recognition is to repeat past errors.  I thus urge moral generosity with respect to the ethical claims of intelligent machines.

Two Concepts of Community

Journal Article
Erica L. Neely
Social Philosophy Today 28, 147-158. doi: 10.5840/socphiltoday20122810 (2012)
Publication year: 2012

Abstract: Communities play an important role in many areas of philosophy, ranging from epistemology through social and political philosophy.  However, two notions of community are often conflated.  The descriptive concept of community takes a community to be a collection of individuals satisfying a particular description.  The relational concept of community takes a community to consist of more than a set of members satisfying a particular trait; there must also be a relation of recognition among the members or between the members and the community as a whole.  The descriptive concept is simpler, however, it does not provide a sufficiently robust concept of community.  I argue instead that the relational notion is philosophically richer and  more accurately captures the true nature of a community.